Bobby Bell: Would Like To Play In Today’s NFL

Bobby Bell played in Super Bowl I, won Super Bowl IV, and has attended 46 of the other 47 Super Bowls (he missed one back in the 1980s for reasons he can’t remember). The former linebacker and defensive end was also the first Kansas City Chief inducted into the Hall of Fame.

That’s quite a career.

“They can’t cut me, they can’t trade me, and I’m there for the rest of my life and after I’m gone,” Bell said of the Hall of Fame on CBS Sports Radio’s After Hours with Amy Lawrence. “I’m still on the same team. We are definitely a fraternity. The guys that I played against, we’re all on the same team. Hey, that’s what’s good about it. We don’t have to hit anybody, we don’t have to touch anybody. That’s good.”

Bell, 75, obviously played in a much different era but would love to play in today’s NFL.

“Oh yeah, I would like to play now,” he said. “I’d probably still be playing now. They don’t have the same rules that they had when he joined. I can play. Can you guys play with my rules back then? They didn’t hold no punches back then.”

Looking ahead to Super Bowl 50, Bell said the Broncos need to have someone spy Cam Newton at all times and make him win from the pocket. If he gets outside the pocket, well, you’ve got to bring him down – and fast.

“You got to catch him before he gets enough speed,” Bell said. “They got to stop him. In order to stop him, they got to put somebody on him. Say, ‘Hey, that’s your man. If he goes to the bench, go there. If he goes to the bathroom, go there. Just make sure you stay on him. Don’t let him trick you. That’s your man. Don’t worry about anyone else.’”

Manning, to put it mildly, isn’t quite as mobile as Newton.

“He’s getting up in age,” Bell said. “He can’t move. I think everybody would love to have a Cam Newton at this age. He’s doing the right thing. He’s running it, he’s enjoying (himself).”

Whatever happens this Sunday, Bell has been amazed by how big the Super Bowl – and the NFL – has become.

“No way we thought the game was going to become like this,” he said. “The first Super Bowl, the most expensive ticket was $12; $7.50 got you in the game and it didn’t sell out. And now you can’t get nowhere close to the place.”

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